Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of job demands on job stress and the moderating effects of job control and procedural justice. Specifically, first, the job demands were divided into quantitative demands and qualitative demands, and relative effects of the two demands on job stress were compared. Second, the moderating effects of job control and procedural justice were tested. Data were collected from 454 employees engaged in various domestic companies. The results showed that both quantitative and qualitative demands had positively significant effects on job stress and qualitative demands had a greater effect on job stress than quantitative demands did. The results of moderating effects showed that job control had a moderating effect on the relationship between quantitative demand and job stress whereas there was no moderating effect of job control on the relationship between qualitative demand and job stress. Also there was a moderating effect of procedural justice on the relationship between quantitative demand and job stress, but contrary to the hypothesis, the relationship was stronger when procedural justice was high. Finally, the academic significance and practical implications of the study, the limitations and future research were discussed.